Your scene selection process for full series ?

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Ileia
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Re: Your scene selection process for full series ?

Post by Ileia » Sun Jul 26, 2015 6:56 am

No, I don't encode them again. I export the full episodes as segments, pull each onto the timeline and search through it for scenes that I would want to use and make clips of just that part (which in Magix, is just a matter of hitting a copy-paste button and pulling the edge of the video clip box back until the scene I want starts/ends). Then I leave them all there on my timeline where I can easily see and access them. Each is essentially a copy of the full file, so I can pull them forward or back if I want to check the surrounding footage again. It should be noted that Magix is different from some other NLEs, the preview window is ONLY a preview window for what is on the timeline and I don't need to load the video there to make clips, I just drop it straight on the timeline.

Anyway, here's what it looks like:


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Sometimes I organize the clips or sometimes I just leave them in chronological order.

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CmoididiReal
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Re: Your scene selection process for full series ?

Post by CmoididiReal » Sun Jul 26, 2015 7:00 am

Ho that look realy useful. So you do the scene selection/encoding episodes in that "magix" software but you also edit in this? or you just do a raw edit and go in vegas or 1ere after that?
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Re: Your scene selection process for full series ?

Post by Ileia » Sun Jul 26, 2015 7:12 am

I also edit in Magix. Most of my videos are "raw" (fades, zooms, simple stuff). Magix itself is very simple and has few effects that I find useful, so I need to do an effect or mask something, I just create it in Photoshop.

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Re: Your scene selection process for full series ?

Post by Qyot27 » Mon Jul 27, 2015 1:25 am

If I know I'll only be using particular episodes, I'll rip only those (or even only the particular chapter sections I need; SmartRipper can do that). Otherwise, I rip the entire series to separate episodes and keep them in a holding area named '[Series Name]\HQ'.

Use DGIndex or FFMS2 on the episodes.

Make tiny MJPEG copies of the episodes, resized down to 432x240. Keep these in a different folder ('[Series Name]\LQ') from the original MPEG-2 or H.264 copies.

Scrub through the MJPEG encodes with VirtualDub (if I need to see them larger, I can use the 200% zoom in VDub itself), noting down the frame numbers in Notepad like this:

Code: Select all

1
345,380
450,678
...

2
432,890
1003,1056
...
At this point, I used to then load the HQ versions into VirtualDub, seek directly to the frame range with Ctrl+G, set the in/out points, and add them to the Job Control. When I was finished setting all the in/out points on all the episodes, I just let the Job Control run automatically, with all the clips going into '[Project Short Name]\clips'. The clips will be encoded as RGB24 HuffYUV and the naming scheme was a simple '1.avi', '2.avi', etc.

One of the big differences these days is that I learned to take advantage of shell scripting, so I no longer use VirtualDub to do anything but scrub the MJPEGs to get the frame ranges. Instead, I turn the frame range notes into a batch script that generates individual AviSynth scripts for each clip (it can do this in less than a second, depending on how many scripts it's generating), and then I use a for loop in bash to have ffmpeg encode all the clip scripts to HuffYUV in the same directory structure that I mentioned above. For simplicity, the names are usually zero-padded now: '001.avi', '002.avi', etc. I think the most clips I've ever had to generate was in the 400s range.

To illustrate, those notes above would be turned into a script that looks a bit like this:

Code: Select all

echo Import("ep1.avs").Trim(345,380)>001.avs
echo Import("ep1.avs").Trim(450,678)>002.avs
echo Import("ep2.avs").Trim(432,890)>003.avs
echo Import("ep2.avs").Trim(1003,1056)>004.avs
The ep1.avs and ep2.avs imported scripts are refering to the HQ copies and have all the pre-processing done in-script. Actually reformatting the notes into this format isn't hard, since you can take advantage of the column duplication and enumeration functions in spreadsheet programs (or get equally fancy and use more scripts and one-liners to do it with CLI tools).

Then to encode:

Code: Select all

for n in *.avs ; do ffmpeg -i "$n" -vcodec huffyuv "../../[Project Short Name]/clips/${n%.*}.avi" ; done
Beyond that, my current project does happen to be from Blu-ray, so those individual 1080p clips will be reduced again, to 480p (still lossless, so my eyes don't bleed during editing; probably resized down with Bilinear). Identical names. I'll edit with the 480p clips, and then swap them out for the 1080s when I go to do the final export.

As far as selection during editing is concerned, it's usually however I'm struck when I sit down to edit. I'll often have a rough idea of how some scenes should look (otherwise I probably wouldn't have started the video), and do any adjustments as necessary to what I had already envisioned. Then I work on the rest, usually working linearly from start to finish. Premiere shows thumbnails of the clips in the clip window, and since I keep the ranges in the clips bounded by scene changes, I know I'm not missing anything. The song itself is usually on repeat, and I'd probably been listening to it a lot before the project even started, so I'll already have a feeling for what sorts of clips I need. Oftentimes I'll just take whatever is visually important, even if the song doesn't seem to support it - you can never fully tell whether you can *make* it work, until you see it placed on the timeline.

If I have a shortage of clips, I think more about what should go there, and then refer back to the MJPEG copies to find the clip I need, and then get the new clip from the HQ copy as usual.

Tigrin wrote:Umm, I'm kind of curious... several people have mentioned creating "clips" of episodes... are you literally going through and making separate video files of clips from episodes?? I said "clips" above but actually I meant I make "sub clips"... I have all the episodes I'm working with in a single Premiere project, and make referenced sub clips. Actually, I usually go through an entire episode and separate it into chunks/sub clips using a naming convention something like "ep01_opening" or "ep01_sc01_desc"... episode number, scene number (I decide this mostly based on when the location changes or something like that), very short description of whatever's in the clip. If I did a multi-anime AMV I guess I would include an abbreviated title at the beginning of that too. Using sub clips also allows me to potentially use footage before or after whatever I chose if necessary. I'll usually have a bin for each episode, and separate bins if I'm looking for certain characters or whatever. When making my Death Note AMV I had a bin for "Light crazy faces" and that was fun. :T Anyway, episodes already take up a lot of disc space, so I'm wondering why encode and create clip files on top of that...?
Yes - see above.
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Re: Your scene selection process for full series ?

Post by Bauzi » Fri Jul 31, 2015 5:00 am

BasharOfTheAges wrote:I'll scrub inside my editing software after transcoding the entire thing. I go through a lot of hard drive space. =/

As to scene selection in general... Well, I've never done anything without some sort of story or plan in mind for at least a third of it. I tend to put that part together first and logically fill in as many gaps as I can with [...]
The basics are quite similar for me.

If I work with a lot of material I don't retranscode the whole material. I only do this if I work with some movies. That's when I transcode it into a lossless codec, otherwise I remux mkv files with h.264 streams into mp4 files without reencoding. I know that h.264 is not meant for editing and is a poor choice, but it works for me :shark: If you know what your system can handle and what you can expect as file handling errors, you can pull it off without major issues and pleasing visual quality. Unfortunately I sometimes have to switch to older Premiere Pro versions which can handle the transcode better.

If I already watched the anime, I won't rewatch it again. When I already have a concept in mind and watch a new possible anime for it, I will take notes and keep a shotlist in Evernote. A shotlist makes creating your clips a so much easier task. Otherwise I just load the footage in my source monitor and start to search for scenes that might fit. Quantity over quality is everything at that stage. It tells me a lot about feasibility of the vision the video that I have in mind. Most of the time I have to rethink the concept at least a little bit.

It also happens that I have to freeze a project, because the current seasons don't have enough material for my concept. That's when I wait for the new seasons to be released on bluray. For example it happend last year in summer when I worked with Psycho-Pass. Season 2 and a movie got announced and I knew that working on the video at that time would have been pointless. The final video would have been much better with S2 and the movie in it for sure. The project is now on ice.

For me spotting clips is one of the most annoying parts of creating an AMV. It's not really fun to me :uhoh: It only gets exciting if you find some surprisingly fitting clips of which you haven't thought before.



It's really interesting to read about your workflow guys :) Seems like we've all created an individual workflow over the years.
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https://www.animemusicvideos.org/video/202928

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Re: Your scene selection process for full series ?

Post by Dragonrider1227 » Sun Aug 02, 2015 11:54 pm

I agree. Hearing everyone's creative process is very interesting. I agree with Bauzi. Looking for the right clips is the most tedious part of AMV editing. Especially if it's an anime I'm not so familiar with. For them I have a similar method as everyone else. I watch the anime and take notes at what exact moments I want to use before converting for editing. For animes I DO know, I tend to have a good idea what clips I want or I know the series well enough that I know where to look if I'm short on ideas so I just convert the whole epiosdes and pick my clips from the editor.

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Re: Your scene selection process for full series ?

Post by TnAdct1 » Wed Aug 19, 2015 12:36 pm

In terms of how I handled footage for my recent video, I actually mixed it up a bit. As I started working on the video, depending on the show I was using, the source footage that I was using can be anywhere from an "act" from an episode all the way to the whole episode itself. As work progressed on the video, I eventually started to save room on the hard drive that I was storing my clips on by using an AVI trimmer to cut the footage down to clips that I wanted to use in the video (although I still save the whole episode on a separate hard drive so that way I have it ready when searching for another clip).

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