Pricewatch help...

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dwchang
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Post by dwchang » Wed Mar 19, 2003 11:03 pm

kthulhu wrote:Can I get my endorsement check now?
LOL :lol:

I guess if you bought a Thoroughbred B or Barton since I worked on those a few months ago. :-P
-Daniel
Newest Video: Through the Years and Far Away aka Sad Girl in Space

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SS5_Majin_Bebi
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Post by SS5_Majin_Bebi » Wed Mar 19, 2003 11:06 pm

I have an AMD Athlon XP 1800+ now and it works wonders. Very efficient and capable. Wish it was a 3000+ but...I dont have that kind of money, and I don't know if my motherboard could handle it :cry:

By the way, whats the "thoroughbred" tacked on to the end of it mean, if anything?

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dwchang
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Post by dwchang » Wed Mar 19, 2003 11:25 pm

SS5_Majin_Bebi wrote:I have an AMD Athlon XP 1800+ now and it works wonders. Very efficient and capable. Wish it was a 3000+ but...I dont have that kind of money, and I don't know if my motherboard could handle it :cry:

By the way, whats the "thoroughbred" tacked on to the end of it mean, if anything?
Well a model 3000+ is a Barton model. It has a larger cache and higher Front-side Bus, so you will *at least* need a BIOS upgrade. It really depends on what you have. Also, to maximize the performance, you'd need new RAM that runs at the equivalent FSB. I personally would rather just wait (if yours is sufficient) and go all out when you need to. That's what I did and I *hope* for it to last 3 - 5 years.
-Daniel
Newest Video: Through the Years and Far Away aka Sad Girl in Space

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Post by SS5_Majin_Bebi » Wed Mar 19, 2003 11:29 pm

yeah, I'm probably just gonna save up and get either a 2600+ or maybe a 2800+ when I have the money, i'm fairly sure my m'board can handle that. its not a top end board though, it was in a budget system. Its like a Shuttle M32KN or something like that. I'll look tonight and find out.

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Re: Building..

Post by TaranT » Thu Mar 20, 2003 2:11 am

anneke wrote:I'm scared to build the computer myself. I have some people at work who are willing to help me, but I don't know. I feel bad having them help me. My father could help me but he has a habit of frying mother boards.

I would prefer to have the main pieces assembled. I know I can plug in a few drives, and the video card, but it's the whole mother board to case to fan thing and plugging in memory or what ever that freaks me....
That's the impression I was getting, so probably a lot of the above is useless information. The obvious option is to get a complete system from CompUSA, Best Buy, etc. The Compaqs and eMachines can be used for editing, and some of the Sony's are built for it. eMachines can be found at good prices. But be advised that the internals of the name brand machines can be different than the accepted standards.

Another option is to find a small to medium sized PC shop in your local area. Every urban area has several of these; the names and sizes will vary. The guys working in these places usually (not always!) know what they're talking about. They build their PCs on the premises and typically to order. If you can build a relationship at one of them, you can get more help and info than at the large stores. The warranties are shorter (90 days typical), but service and repair is onsite.

One of the larger chains is PC Club. A couple of these just opened up in the Seattle area and we've started to buy stuff from them. Prices are a bit higher than the e-tailers, but still...they're not bad.

I mention PC Club because their "locations" page lists a large number of stores in California. You might be able to find one close to you. They currently have a P4 2.4GHz system in your price range ($629 + upgrades).

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Learning

Post by anneke » Thu Mar 20, 2003 11:01 am

Well I'm learning some stuff. I may be a computer programmer but when it comes to hardware I'm lost. I don't want to just buy a Dell or such off the shelf, because I did that last time, and didn't get my money's worth. The system was not as good as I needed or hoped. And why two years later I'm upgrading.

Anneke
http://www.bakadeshiproductions.com
(Stop by for a different Video each month...)

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Zarxrax
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Post by Zarxrax » Thu Mar 20, 2003 12:28 pm

You need to upgrade every two years anyways ;p

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dwchang
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Post by dwchang » Thu Mar 20, 2003 12:40 pm

Zarxrax wrote:You need to upgrade every two years anyways ;p
Nah! I intend to use my dual athlons for a long time. I had a friend in college who had a dual PII 400 while I had a PII 400 with both of us coming in as a freshman. By my Junior year, I had to upgrade to a 1.2 Ghz, but his dual PII was still sufficient. I might add it was better in a lot of ways (it is two processors).

Then again, I shouldn't say "definitely" since I do work at AMD and getting free chips REALLY makes upgrades cheap. In theory, all I'd have to get is a new MB when the MP Athlon 64's really pick up. I'm guessing my two HDs, DVD+/-RW, soundcard, etc. could go into it. Then again, I could realistically see myself doing small upgrades like video cards (GeForce FX perhaps?) and RAM throughout the years, but almost everyone should do that to maximize the lifetime of their computer.

In conclusion...build a dual :).
-Daniel
Newest Video: Through the Years and Far Away aka Sad Girl in Space

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Post by klinky » Thu Mar 20, 2003 6:56 pm

It's really not that hard to build a computer. So long as you atleast touch something metal before you go diving into building it. There really isn't anything you can hook up backwards or wrong that would make the computer blow up.


There should be some tutorials out there on how to do this easily enough.


It's not that hard :o

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Post by TaranT » Fri Mar 21, 2003 2:51 am

klinky wrote:It's really not that hard to build a computer. So long as you at least touch something metal before you go diving into building it.
Someone who has seen Serial Experiments Lain might get the idea that standing in a pool of water while building a PC is a good idea. It ain't. In fact, it's a really bad idea. And Lain's advice to work on hardware while in your underwear...that's just interesting. I'd pull the drapes before I did that, but everybody's different :roll: .
There really isn't anything you can hook up backwards or wrong that would make the computer blow up....
This is mostly true with the exception of IDE and floppy drive cables. Nowadays they are usually keyed (there's only one way to plug them in). But I have come across cables that were keyed the wrong way or which had no key at all. It pays to know where pin 1 is and that's not always obvious. Also, connecting the LED and switch wires from the case can be confusing w.r.t. polarity.

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Post by klinky » Fri Mar 21, 2003 2:57 am

Yeah that those can be confusing, though they won't kill the computer if it happens. Just need to flip the cables around.


:O

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Post by Dannywilson » Fri Mar 21, 2003 6:20 am

TaranT wrote:And Lain's advice to work on hardware while in your underwear...that's just interesting. I'd pull the drapes before I did that, but everybody's different :roll: .
I built all of my computers in some state of undress, from lack of shirt and shoes, to completely in the buff.
"in the morning when i have wood..i like to walk around my house and bump random shit with it.... " -Random comment on grouphug.us

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Ashyukun
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Post by Ashyukun » Fri Mar 21, 2003 8:25 am

TaranT wrote:
Kllinky wrote:There really isn't anything you can hook up backwards or wrong that would make the computer blow up....
This is mostly true with the exception of IDE and floppy drive cables. Nowadays they are usually keyed (there's only one way to plug them in). But I have come across cables that were keyed the wrong way or which had no key at all. It pays to know where pin 1 is and that's not always obvious. Also, connecting the LED and switch wires from the case can be confusing w.r.t. polarity.
Heh. Yeah, floppy drives in particular can be a pain. Just ask the horde of people who didn't win what they should have in the AMD PC building competition last year due to the floppy drive cable being hooked up backwards. :P
DannyWilson wrote:I built all of my computers in some state of undress, from lack of shirt and shoes, to completely in the buff.
Besides that being way more information than I think we needed, should we start calling you Largo, Danny?

It really isn't too hard to build a computer, Anneke. Though it's probably best to watch someone else building one and see what they do to get a general idea for it first. I'd imagine if you ask around you can probably find someone near you (ideally someone you know) that can build the computer for you if you have the parts. If you generally stay out of the way, you can probably get them to let you watch how they do it, and ask questions along the way. As long as you don't try forcing anything to go where it doesn't belong, the only thing you usually have to worry about doing wrong that could really cause problems is breaking the CPU when putting on the HSF. Also, make sure all the cards and cables are all the way in and seated properly. As we found out once, computers do strange things when you don't get both motherboard power supply cables all the way plugged in...
Bob 'Ash' Babcock
Electric Leech Productions

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dwchang
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Post by dwchang » Fri Mar 21, 2003 10:57 am

Heh. Yeah, floppy drives in particular can be a pain. Just ask the horde of people who didn't win what they should have in the AMD PC building competition last year due to the floppy drive cable being hooked up backwards.
Haha! I remember that. We had one of those down here in Austin (makes sense since we're located here). I think *maybe* one person got theirs to post. I heard around the country very few people got their computers to post. I guess the time constraint really makes people forget things.
-Daniel
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Ashyukun
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Post by Ashyukun » Fri Mar 21, 2003 11:02 am

I was at the NYC one- ended up with a hat.

Both of the guys in the finals of the PC Building contest hooked up the floppy drive cable backwards. Still, I don't feel too sorry for them... while I can't remember if they walked away with any money, they both got two free CPUs and some other AMD swag out of the deal. :P
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