How I run the Twixtor Business

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How I run the Twixtor Business

Postby lolligerjoj » Tue Mar 11, 2014 2:17 pm

Hey there.

I started considering doing something like this a few weeks after Into The Labyrinth premiered, but have always been too lazy to do so. I figured that questions about how to use Twixtor would not last for very long, but I was wrong. So instead of continuing to answer every question from 0 again, here is the text I will link to everytime someone asks me again :P. I originally planned to transform this to a fully fledged tutorial with pictures and examples and such nice things at one point, but I guess my limited time and my laziness will postpone such events into a distant future.
Note that this is my procedure for using animated ("cartoony") footage only, using regular live-action footage or other stuff that is more true to it's playback framerate is way easier to handle and doesn't require most of the stuff I detail here.

Let me warn you that motion interpolation using Twixtor limits you really strongly in your scene selection. There are only certain scenes that can be interpolated well, and moving hair usually indicates that it at least will be pretty difficult. I always look for scenes that don't change much between 2 different "redrawn" frames. That's the case when the scene already uses slow-motion or slow movement in general. Fast action scenes or badly animated scenes usually tend to look really bad when interpolated.
For Twixtor I developed a kind of motion-interpolation-workflow in After Effects that looks like this:
Let Comp A be the comp where you want to do your "usual" editing in. I import the raw footage into there, kind of put it in place, and then pre-comp it (ctrl+shift+c). I name it something with "Twixtor Output" and check "Leave all attributes...". Then I open this newly created comp, it should contain your raw footage and have the exact same framerate and resolution as your clip. This is where I apply Twixtor (or Twixtor Pro for difficult scenes), and set the "input framerate" to the exact framerate of the clip (and comp). This is also where the masking happens in case I use Twixtor pro, after I completed the following steps.
Then I pre-comp again (ctrl+shift+c), name it something with "Twixtor Input" and check "leave all attributes" again. I open that comp, should find the raw clip again, and make sure that the scene is time-remapped in a way so that every new frame of that new comp represents an actual "newdrawn" frame in the animation. So for most scenes in anime that means I simply speed the footage up by 300% (stretch the clip to 33.333% length), or 200% (50%). Some more complicated scenes (in Bakemonogatari for example) require me to use manual time-remapping for every frame, because the "newdrawn" frametimes sometimes change in the middle of the scene. After that you can go all back to comp A again and use the "Twixtor Output" comp in any way you want: Slow it down, use "Force Motion Blur", incrcease the framerate of comp A, and all other kinds of useful stuff, the "Twixtor Output" should always display the exact correctly interpolated frame. For example if you use timeremapping so that you request a frame "12.5", it will actually display a interpolated frame exactly in the middle between frame 12 and frame 13. Notice that if you don't do anything with it it should already show some interpolation because it should have changed the "anime-typical stuttering" to actual fluid motion that shows a "newdrawn" frame every single frame rather than every 3rd or 2nd frame.
This is where you rather frequently will notice that the interpolation looks horrible, that's where the fine-tuning with Twixtor Pro comes into play. I will not explain that, it is beautifully explained in the Manual for Twixtor Pro that comes with it. (You set a directory of the manual when installing Twixtor). But keep in mind that everything regarding that should be done in the "Twixtor Output" comp. Many times even Twixtor Pro can't help make the footage look good, that's when you should start thinking about giving up that particular scene and look for something more Twixtor compatible instead.

I hope this can be of some help, I realize that this is not written beautifully, so if you got any more questions: The thread should be open. Sometimes I'm available on Skype, the skype name is pretty easy to guess.
Also, I'm pretty sure there is at least one mistake in this rather bumpy explanation, so ask me if something doesn't work as it should, and I will correct it if it really is an error.
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Re: How I run the Twixtor Business

Postby Enigmo » Thu Mar 13, 2014 8:54 pm

*sigh* publicly revealing good techniques eventually leads to it becoming a horrible effect. Like I remember a lot of people criticising your use of twitch, which I personally didn't have a problem with. The main reason they thought it was bad was because twitch has become something that people learned to use, and then they eventually abused it. Same is likely to happen with twixtor when they can all use it as well as you--people will squeeze out reasons to turn it into trash.
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Re: How I run the Twixtor Business

Postby lolligerjoj » Fri Mar 14, 2014 11:13 am

That'd be right if it were as easy as applying twitch, but it certainly isn't something a great portion of the community will adopt, since it isn't compatible with how ppl usually create their videos. I just posted it because I get asked it a whole lot, I know that most ppl that asked me gave up on it in the end.
Also, this isn't some secret knowledge. What should I say to people asking about it? "No I don't really want you to use Twixtor, it's mine"?
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Re: How I run the Twixtor Business

Postby Enigmo » Fri Mar 14, 2014 5:31 pm

No, you do what you did when I asked you, you tell them to read the manual and learn it the way you learned it. It's more fair, and all-in-all better to let others go through the same process as you, than you going through the process and giving them a shortcut. I haven't read what you posted here, so I don't know how much easier you might have made it to understand than the manual, but yeah.... And I'm sure people will find a way to ruin Twixtor beyond its already-known flaws like the warping--there always is.
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Re: How I run the Twixtor Business

Postby MouseBollocks » Tue Mar 18, 2014 3:12 pm

I'll admit, I spent ages trying to work out how to do this. I didn't even use the manual, I just tried to work it out myself (Guess how well that went). The thing was, after I'd tried and failed, I sat back and thought about it, and realised that I wasn't actually trying to pull off the effect for any other reason other than I wanted to see how certain clips would look with it. Once I'd realised this and about how it's not exactly an easy effect to pull off, I kind of just said "Fuck it. I have no intent of using this, so I'm not going to spend ages learning it", and since then I haven't really thought about using it at all. This might be overly optimistic of me, but I honestly believe that other people might have the same reaction, even after this guide is published. Twitch has become used so much because it's relatively easy to use and provides for an easy way to sync when you can't be fucked to do anything more interesting. Motion Interpolation serves no such purpose in AMVs, and is difficult to pull off correctly on top of that. This ultimately means that people who just slap effects onto videos with no effort, time or consideration put in will give up on it, leaving only the people who are willing to put that time in, and even then, I'm willing to bet that for a lot of people, if the effect will serve no purpose in their video, they won't bother going through all the trouble of trying to implement the effect.

I'm really glad this guide exists. I can read it, try the effect on the clips I wanted to originally, and then forget about it entirely. I personally believe that a lot of people will do the same thing, and the effect won't become massively overused to the extent of it being ruined. Or maybe I'm wrong, and in a couple of year we'll be seeing every crappy Youtube AMV using motion interpolation horribly. Then I'll just look an idiot.
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Re: How I run the Twixtor Business

Postby kutiekittykandykorn » Sun Apr 06, 2014 12:06 pm

Do you have to have a special AMV program to do Twixtor?
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Re: How I run the Twixtor Business

Postby kutiekittykandykorn » Sun Apr 06, 2014 12:07 pm

Do you have to have a special AMV program to do Twixtor?
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Re: How I run the Twixtor Business

Postby lolligerjoj » Thu Apr 10, 2014 3:36 pm

I mentioned in the text that I use After Effects, and it is indeed the only program I use for video editing.
Twixtor supports pretty much all the standard software including Premiere, After Effects, Vegas and more.
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Re: How I run the Twixtor Business

Postby ThalesEditions » Sat May 24, 2014 3:09 pm

kutiekittykandykorn wrote:Do you have to have a special AMV program to do Twixtor?

He used After Effects GUY!!! Twixtor is a particular plugin for the most of video editors, but, on after effects is better.
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Re: How I run the Twixtor Business

Postby kutiekittykandykorn » Sat May 24, 2014 6:55 pm

ThalesEditions wrote:
kutiekittykandykorn wrote:Do you have to have a special AMV program to do Twixtor?

He used After Effects GUY!!! Twixtor is a particular plugin for the most of video editors, but, on after effects is better.

So all I have to do is download it and it will work with my video editing program?
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Re: How I run the Twixtor Business

Postby lolligerjoj » Sun Jun 29, 2014 3:58 am

Yeah, Twixtor supports the biggest editing programs including After Effects, Premiere, Vegas and Final Cut.
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Re: How I run the Twixtor Business

Postby kutiekittykandykorn » Sun Jun 29, 2014 9:24 am

lolligerjoj wrote:Yeah, Twixtor supports the biggest editing programs including After Effects, Premiere, Vegas and Final Cut.


Okay! Thank you so much!
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Re: How I run the Twixtor Business

Postby ShodanKid » Thu Jul 17, 2014 2:27 am

Creators with 'secrets' is not a creator to know. That's all lolligerjoj is doing...people have been curious about this effect. Like all things, there are those who will use it in improper ways, and those who will innovate. It's a community of people who want to try things. You can't help what happens afterward, but there is no reason to keep it secret either.

And given some of the comments I've seen on my videos it is disappointing when people feel they can't aspire to try interesting things especially when on the face of it...it isn't so complicated...but when you have talented editors that realize its not about complex or flash or flare that makes an audience curious, but a collection of simplicity to bring a greater sense of depth. You just see that more clearly with overuse. Who's to say those who 'dream to aspire' can't blow you out of the water with nothing more than a razer blade and tape against their favorite anime? Play!

I shouldn't browse forums before bed. When I'm crazy like that. :shock:
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