Converting 120 FPS to 24 or 30 FPS

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Converting 120 FPS to 24 or 30 FPS

Postby ReligionX » Mon Nov 13, 2006 2:53 pm

I've done many searches on how to convert a 120 FPS video file into some other frame rate. I've seen and read many answers, methods, and ways of doing this. My problem is that I have no idea what any of the answers mean. I've read up on what an AVISynth script IS, but I have no idea what any of the scripts [b]DO/b].

I am trying to create a new video file to edit with that doesn't have jerky video.

I'm running:
Windows XP
Ulead Visual Media Studio 8.0
Virtual Dub 1.5.4.1

---

I run the following AVISynth Script:

DirectShowSource("ReligionXVideo.avi").trim(8,0)
ConvertToYUY2()
MultiDecimate(pass=1)

and get an mfile.txt that starts out:

0 0.000000
1 0.036328
2 0.061358
3 0.048263
4 0.056162
5 0.060303

---

I've also tried running:

DirectShowSource("ReligionXVideo.avi")
Decimate(cycle=2)
Decimate(cycle=2)
Decimate(cycle=5,mode=3,threshold=1)

to no avail. It seems to go even faster than the other script, it looks like I am missing more frames, and it renders in VirtualDub the same way.

---

I don't actually know if it IS working how it should, or if there's something that I am not doing. I go to save it as an uncompressed file using VirtualDub, and it hangs in limbo after the "fast forwarded" video is completed, and infinitely increases it's estimated completion time.
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Postby Zarxrax » Mon Nov 13, 2006 8:20 pm

Download avi_tc_package from here: http://forum.doom9.org/showthread.php?t=82264

Run tc-gui.exe.
Load your avi file, and specify output files.
Press run.

The output avi should be what you want, but audio will no longer sync. That is probably not a problem though.
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Postby ReligionX » Tue Nov 14, 2006 12:43 am

Awesome. Thank you. That's exactly what I wanted to have happen, but unfortunately it doesn't solve the means to which I was hoping to achieve. So, I'll ask another question. How can I get this video file to not have jerky sections?

When I render either of the following files:

Source File:
Format: 24 bits, [704 x 396]
Compression: ffdshow MPEG-4 Video Decoder
Frame Rate: 119.880

OR

Video File Run Through tc-GUI.exe:
Format: 24 bits, [704 x 396]
Compression: ffdshow MPEG-4 Video Decoder
Frame Rate: 29.970

In Ulead Visual Media Studio 8.0, using the following settings:
Create: AVI File
Format: 24-Bit RGB [704x396]
Frame Type: Frame-based
Compression: Huffyuv v2.1.1 - CCESP Patch v0.2.5
Frame Rate: 29.970

It still comes out jerky. I don't believe it's the source file since it plays back fine before I try to render it. And when I render other video files with these settings, they come out fine.
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Postby Willen » Tue Nov 14, 2006 4:28 am

I use SelectEvery(5) for 23.976 fps or SelectEvery(4) for 29.97 fps. It's a bit inaccurate since we are just tossing out frames at a set pattern instead of checking if it is actually a null frame that should be ignored. If the video is truly of mixed frame rate material then you may need to do parts at 29.97 and others at 23.976 to reproduce the original frame rates.

Basic AviSynth script:

DirectShowSource("C:\path\Your120fpsVideo.avi", fps=119.88, ConvertFPS=true)
SelectEvery(4) #for 29.97fps, else use (5) for 23.976fps


The green colored text specifying the frame rate of the video is optional and may not be recognized by older versions of AviSynth. It should increase the accuracy of the output, but the script should run fine without it.
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Postby Gepetto » Tue Nov 14, 2006 4:34 am

ReligionX wrote:Compression: ffdshow MPEG-4 Video Decoder


Does that mean DivX or XviD? If so, that could be the answer to your problem. Lossy codecs are fine for playback, but they wreak havoc on editing software. Try saving with a lossless codec to see if it works.

And for the sake of quenching my curiosity, where did you get 120fps footage? o.o
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Postby Willen » Tue Nov 14, 2006 5:41 am

Gepetto wrote:
ReligionX wrote:Compression: ffdshow MPEG-4 Video Decoder


Does that mean DivX or XviD? If so, that could be the answer to your problem. Lossy codecs are fine for playback, but they wreak havoc on editing software. Try saving with a lossless codec to see if it works.

And for the sake of quenching my curiosity, where did you get 120fps footage? o.o

The internet, since I assume those are RAWs or VFR fansubs. But remember, you shouldn't ask where to get this type of footage and ReligionX shouldn't tell you. At least not here...
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Postby Gepetto » Tue Nov 14, 2006 8:46 am

that's not what I meant, I wanted to know where it was from. Last I heard, CG graphics in games went as high as 72fps, not 120. TV shows are broadcasted at 24 or 30 (rounding the decimals), so I was curious.

and what would be the advantage of variable framerate? (assuming that's what you mean by VFR)
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Postby ReligionX » Tue Nov 14, 2006 10:43 am

Thank you guys for giving this thread attention. I'm still not resolved quite yet, though.

Willen wrote:Basic AviSynth script:

DirectShowSource("C:\path\Your120fpsVideo.avi", fps=119.88, ConvertFPS=true)
SelectEvery(4) #for 29.97fps, else use (5) for 23.976fps
This doesn't work for me. I'm running a total of those exact 2 lines of script in my .avs file. Do I need to have other lines? I've still got audio playing. Is there some way to remove the audio track, and would that even make a difference?

I've found an archive of dozens of AVISynth scripts, but none of them actually say what they DO. So, I am literally copying and pasting what other people have done, in hopes that it works, without any understanding of why. I can't tell the difference between SelectEvery(#) and Decimate(cycle=#). And I certainly have no idea how or where I would find out the logistics of "Decimate(cycle=5,mode=3,threshold=1)"

Your typing in green reminded me of a puzzle in Myst where you had to make 12 icons on stones either red or green. That script archive is only useful if I do a reverse google look-up to find instances of it being mentioned in a forum somewhere to find out what it does. One at a time. Trying to make an AMV feels like I’m playing Myst all over again.

Gepetto wrote:and what would be the advantage of variable framerate? (assuming that's what you mean by VFR)
I read about it here which is why I was thinking that I could solve this using AVISynth, since someone else says they did.
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Postby Gepetto » Tue Nov 14, 2006 11:08 am

According to this, three out of four frames are dropped. So
Code: Select all
Decimate(2).Decimate(2)
should work.
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Postby Zarxrax » Tue Nov 14, 2006 11:15 am

ReligionX wrote:It still comes out jerky. I don't believe it's the source file since it plays back fine before I try to render it. And when I render other video files with these settings, they come out fine.


You cant play a huffyuv file back in realtime. There is too much data and your hard disk likely cant read it fast enough. This shouldnt be much of a concern. To test that its really not jerky, just convert your huffyuv to something like xvid and watch it. Make sure to still use the huffyuv for your actual editing or whatever, though.
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Postby BasharOfTheAges » Tue Nov 14, 2006 3:01 pm

Gepetto wrote:that's not what I meant, I wanted to know where it was from. Last I heard, CG graphics in games went as high as 72fps, not 120. TV shows are broadcasted at 24 or 30 (rounding the decimals), so I was curious.


It comes from rippers/fansubbers adding in dummy frames to make their e-penis bigger. Most people watching them are too dumb to know that a higher framerate doesn't mean anything.
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Postby ReligionX » Tue Nov 14, 2006 6:51 pm

I'm still having no luck making the video not skip when I render it, no matter what I do. I can show someone the video file if anyone wants to see it, send me a PM.
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Postby Scintilla » Tue Nov 14, 2006 7:18 pm

Gepetto wrote:that's not what I meant, I wanted to know where it was from. Last I heard, CG graphics in games went as high as 72fps, not 120. TV shows are broadcasted at 24 or 30 (rounding the decimals), so I was curious.

I believe it's an effort to solve the problem of hybrid footage: from what I've heard, some shows these days are animated mainly at 24fps but have certain parts done at 30. 120 is the LCD of 24 and 30, so a framerate of 120fps can accomodate this kind of footage without having to use a variable framerate.
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Postby Qyot27 » Wed Nov 15, 2006 3:03 am

Scintilla wrote:
Gepetto wrote:that's not what I meant, I wanted to know where it was from. Last I heard, CG graphics in games went as high as 72fps, not 120. TV shows are broadcasted at 24 or 30 (rounding the decimals), so I was curious.

I believe it's an effort to solve the problem of hybrid footage: from what I've heard, some shows these days are animated mainly at 24fps but have certain parts done at 30. 120 is the LCD of 24 and 30, so a framerate of 120fps can accomodate this kind of footage without having to use a variable framerate.

That's exactly the reason. But there are some cappers that do it for no apparent reason, since there weren't any 29.97/30fps sequences that avi2tc detected. Such is the case with one of the cappers for Galaxy Angel II, although that's an odd case because in a different 120fps raw of the same episode there actually were 29.97 sections, which just makes me wonder what the heck is going on.

And considering the fact that null frames are simply passed over during decoding (hence you won't notice), going up to 120 isn't really necessary. It would only require going up to the highest framerate - which in the case of most shows, would be 29.97.
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Postby Willen » Wed Nov 15, 2006 4:06 am

Qyot27 wrote:
Scintilla wrote:
Gepetto wrote:that's not what I meant, I wanted to know where it was from. Last I heard, CG graphics in games went as high as 72fps, not 120. TV shows are broadcasted at 24 or 30 (rounding the decimals), so I was curious.

I believe it's an effort to solve the problem of hybrid footage: from what I've heard, some shows these days are animated mainly at 24fps but have certain parts done at 30. 120 is the LCD of 24 and 30, so a framerate of 120fps can accomodate this kind of footage without having to use a variable framerate.

That's exactly the reason. But there are some cappers that do it for no apparent reason, since there weren't any 29.97/30fps sequences that avi2tc detected. Such is the case with one of the cappers for Galaxy Angel II, although that's an odd case because in a different 120fps raw of the same episode there actually were 29.97 sections, which just makes me wonder what the heck is going on.

And considering the fact that null frames are simply passed over during decoding (hence you won't notice), going up to 120 isn't really necessary. It would only require going up to the highest framerate - which in the case of most shows, would be 29.97.

The only thing that gets me is that the programs are broadcast at 29.97 fps (actually 59.94 fields per second, interlaced). Why not keep it all at 29.97 fps OR do IVTC and release at 23.976 fps instead of doing 119.88 fps VFR?

And just because I want to do the math:
23.976 x 5 = 119.88
29.970 x 4 = 119.88


To get rid of the audio add KillAudio() to your script thusly:
Code: Select all
DirectShowSource("C:\path\Your120fpsVideo.avi")
SelectEvery(4) #for 29.97fps, else use (5) for 23.976fps
KillAudio() #removes audio stream(s)

I removed the fps=119.88 and ConvertFPS=true arguments from the script since the last time I had those in there, the other person with 120fps footage had issues with the script.
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