How has the hobby made a difference in your life?

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Re: How has the hobby made a difference in your life?

Postby lloyd9988 » Sun Jun 17, 2012 11:44 pm

Phantasmagoriat wrote:Questions:

[list]"How has the hobby made a difference in your life?" Anything big/small, feel free share your story, as I have just shared mine.

"AMV's (and the Hobby as a whole) use the above concept on so many levels. How?"

"If AMV's are a form of Communication. What do they Communicate?"


K, real attempt this time after reading the whole passage and not just following someone else's post. :P

1) The difference it made I guess was small. Never really a huge thing like anyone else's, it's just a hobby that I wanted to get better at. One thing that it definitely has taught me was how to handle criticism and, if someone's angry at me, I tell them to go take an Anger Management class. :awesome: The other difference, which I find fairly negative, is what I agreed with above. Though, I don't have a fat booty (fairly skinny actually), I'm beginning to adopt unhealthy life-styles which I find myself constantly in need of changing. :P Reason why is because I'm just my own constant critic like that. In my life, I've never won awards, I've never really stood out in a crowd much and, any friends I've ever made were by coincidence or by the help of my family. I guess I've never really thought about how AMV's have helped me gain some friends (even though they're online friends), how AMV's and my brother inspire me to want to push myself to want to communicate more with others and how much more esteem it has given me to be confident in myself because, honestly, even though some of you guys think that making AMVs is nothing, some people just can't do what we can do and make it look as awesome as we can. xD Call me cocky but, you know, some of the AMVs I've seen on youtube just proves me right. :P

2) Concept on so many levels?? Umm. . . If you want to make a music video look good, you need to take a lot of time out of your busy schedule to make it look good?? Be harsh but don't flame. Know you can do better than what your doing now. Realize that My Bitches was the best AMV to hit when it came out?? xD Realize the fact that your not getting paid?? Realize you don't care?? Realize that the shit you make is for the purpose of getting better at something you truly believe in?? :P Those kinds of levels?? xD

3) "If AMVs are a form of communication, what do they communicate??" Hmm. . . I actually like this question! :awesome: To me, they communicate emotions, effort and stories. Atmosphere and beauty is the best thing I can use to describe what they communicate because that's all I care to see in AMVs. If there ain't no emotion, then it better be pretty as hell because I ain't going to listen to it for more than a minute until I press the pause button then forget about it. However. . . The one thing I don't see with editors' AMVs is the willingness to take risks. I mean, I think everyone, deep down, wants to be complimented so they stay in the safe zone of their editing style. . . But I don't really see editors just be like: "You know. . . Even though I don't normally do this, I'm going to see how it looks because its something I want to try." :P You know, like obvious rules that you usually follow to make AMVs look good but then decide "You know, lets break that rule and see what happens." I guess I don't see people breaking their own rules just because they want to see what'll happen. :P Idk, anyway, atmosphere is usually what draws me in because I love silence but I love emotion as well so both of them make a great combination. :P

Anyway, those are my serious answers and, after reading what you were saying, I get it and I agree. . . but I'd prefer a method which doesn't include a feeling of "lashing out" at others. :P
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Re: How has the hobby made a difference in your life?

Postby Hopstep » Mon Jun 18, 2012 1:55 am

lloyd9988 wrote: :pizza: Pizza buddies! <---- Major dork, FYI :ying:


YOU. :pizza: :pizza: :pizza:

Meanwhile I noticed I haven't answered any of the main questions at all.

"How has the hobby made a difference in your life?"
Actually macchinainterna's answer on this is very similar to what I was going to write. :awesome:
But of course, it has its nice effects on me too. People know I edit stuffs, so sometimes they'd come to me for help even though I'm still learning myself or let me do the job whenever there are audio visual assignments at school (which is a very good thing since most of these assignments require acting in front of the camera and I've always preferred to work behind the stage than performing on it myself).
Together with that and which I just recently noticed, I seem to be a bit more optimistic because this is the first time I actually find myself useful in something. :beer:
I've been helping my brother with his job as well, and have been sharing the payment for a while now. Basically, it's rewarding.
And at some point, editing has changed the way I think about things. In both positive and negative ways.

"If AMV's are a form of Communication. What do they Communicate?"
Passion of the editor. They communicate their thoughts, ideas and sometimes even their dreams to others through editing.
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Re: How has the hobby made a difference in your life?

Postby Phantasmagoriat » Mon Jun 18, 2012 1:57 am

@Glitzer: Yeah, I knew father's day was approaching, so I really just wanted to get to know him better. To know his story.
I actually find this community is great for socially avoidant people, because it gives you the opportunity to encounter a wide range of personalities, while maintaining your ability to limit your participation to whatever your comfort level is.


Glitzer wrote:it is almost impossible to see where your influence stops.
You know, I often wonder how different I would be if those first few meaningful amv's I watched were different. All those AMV's I was exposed to years ago probably formed the basis for my AMV preferences today. So goes the same for new editors entering the hobby right now.

Glitzer wrote:With some sadness to say, I think it's impossible to truly understand each other. AMVs do give the opportunity to peer into someone else's mind across time and space though, if even for a moment. This binds us, and allows us to share a common experience. At the risk of sounding cheesey, AMVs in this regard can work magic.
I really like this statement.

-------------------


@lloyd9988: If the hobby has developed your growth in any way, shape, or form; I think that says something; regardless of how big or small.


lloyd9988 wrote:has taught me was how to handle criticism
I think a lot of us had that experience the first time we posted something on the org. I know my first time, I got really defensive. Not to the point of being a complete douche, but I had this sense that "This is my creation, I must defend it." But all it takes is the ability to admit when someone else has a valid point, and everything changes.



lloyd9988 wrote:
Phantasmagoriat wrote:"AMV's (and the Hobby as a whole) use the above concept on so many levels. How?"
Concept on so many levels??
Sorry, I should have been more clear. The concept I'm referring to is the one in my signature:
"Effort to Understand; Effort to be Understood; to see through Different Eyes."
So, I'm asking you to think of situations in the hobby where you put in the effort to understand [say, the AMV that you are watching]; when you put in the effort to be understood; and when do you see through the eyes of others.


lloyd9988 wrote:If there ain't no emotion, then it better be pretty as hell
qft


lloyd9988 wrote:However. . . The one thing I don't see with editors' AMVs is the willingness to take risks
yeah, it's a shame.


lloyd9988 wrote:. . . but I'd prefer a method which doesn't include a feeling of "lashing out" at others.
hmmmm... yeah, I can see how you would interpret my post that way, but at the same time, I do get bit pissed when I read snarky remarks, or get a shady, depressing vibe from people who end up dragging everybody else down. So am I "lashing out?" Yes in a way, but part of it could also be the swears, which are necessary for me to convey my emotion (and swears can be misinterpreted. But re-read my post for my new-found view on swears.) Just try taking those out of my post and find out how dry of a read it would be.

Now, a lot of people are going to disagree with this statement, but: In the last couple of years, I've sensed a lack of Real emotion in our communication on these boards. Fuck, when I first joined, the community was booming. And from what I hear, it was even crazier prior to my arrival, so I'm lucky enough to feel the tail end of all that shit. How things got this way? I'm not entirely sure... but I suspect it has something to do with the technical nature of our craft. See. If you add emotion to the equation, you can't be an objective observer; and it's hard to give reviews/feedback and what have you... if you are not objective. So, what do we do? We remove emotion entirely when we give each other feedback... and this extends to our communication in general.

I can't do that any more.

If I feel something, I need to let it out. If you want my opinion, I'll fucking give it to you. <--- try taking the swear out of that sentence, and tell me meaning/emotion is not lost.

We need to start adding subjectivity back into the equation.
We need to start getting back in touch with our emotions.
And it starts by getting mad.

(then channelling that energy in a constructive, level-headed manner ofc)
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Re: How has the hobby made a difference in your life?

Postby TritioAFB » Mon Jun 18, 2012 11:36 pm

I'm going to agree with that statement of yours because the video for itself express a lot of things

I'm going to explain something about the amvs in general terms: When I watch an AMV I can tell how you were feeling in the moment you made the video, the kind of edition inside the video helps a lot. For example I've noticed that when I'm mad or angry I tend to go with Hard Cuts solo, and nothing else like transitions. Or the kind of scene selection.

This of course shouldn't be true in all the cases, because it can also be the consequence of the kind of feelings or impressions, and we subjectively judge them. I tend to read the info about the videos, once I watched them, and at several cases I confirm my doubts. In the past I was interested in the psychology before studying medicine, so it's natural that I applied the psychology to the AMVs.

I know: Everybody that will read this comment of mine are going to say that this is somewhat impossible. And it might be true, but if the video for itself doesn't express something or at least make you feel something, then it's like you can get a similar result when you just want to finish a video without effort and it's just a 'sad clown'
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Re: How has the hobby made a difference in your life?

Postby Phantasmagoriat » Tue Jun 19, 2012 12:05 pm

Yes!

Let me try to explain it another way:

"In the hobby, many times we become too objective, and worry too much about doing things 'correctly' that in the end, there is a certain lack of emotion."

Of course, that's not always the case. Just sometimes.
Basically, I like it when I can really see the fire in people.
And the hobby has given us all that fire at one point or another.

EDIT: although I sense we are starting to pick up steam again. Maybe it's just me, but right now, the AMV Announcement Forum has tons of good videos popping out of nowhere. |:>
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Re: How has the hobby made a difference in your life?

Postby Chained(E)Studio » Wed Jun 20, 2012 12:45 pm

"How has the hobby made a difference in your life?"

Hmmm, I've met my boyfriend through AMVs? If it weren't for that I would still be in a very unhappy relationship/situation and wouldn't strive so hard to give myself the best I can. I have become way more ambitious than I ever was before and have so many things I wish to accomplish now with my life. Too many things !___!

I've met a lot of wonderfull people from all over the world, and formed many friendships that I wouldn't even have if I stopped making AMVs years ago. A lot of people go through life with those around them (physically) which is fine, but I really enjoy having friends from different cultures and places.

I learned who I am, and gained confidence in that through being online, meeting other people online. I used to be one of those people who would be embarrassed if they said "I watch anime, and make AMVs." But now when people ask about my hobbies I'm like "Anime & making AMVs!" Plus, all the other hobbies I have. I find it rather weird and immature when I meet people who hide their online hobbies from their "real" life friends. Makes me wonder if they even know what a friend is, and that its not built on "whats cool, and whats not." -_-

"AMV's (and the Hobby as a whole) use the above concept on so many levels. How?"

I suppose I spend a great deal of time online. Whether its checking other communities for new work or posting here. Maybe its skyping with other editors, checking emails, other sites like facebook/youtube... its all done online. I think that maybe 80% or more of my life over the past 5 years has been spent on a computer. I don't know if its really that bad, I would like to spend more time outside of that but a big part of my life is attached to the computer. My boyfriend for one doesn't even live in Canada, my close friends. To maintain these bonds it requires me to be online, for them and myself. I also find where I live to be greatly well disappointing, and so maybe thats why I spent more time online as well.

In terms of health....I do take care of myself in other ways with eating right, working out when I can etc to help cancel out sitting all day...though... I'm sure staying up till 3am almost every night is still not healthy. So nothing physically has changed with me aside from bags and dark circles =p. Oh, and being a bit pale.. so over all I'm a healthy happy camper (zombie).

"If AMV's are a form of Communication. What do they Communicate?"

I think AMVs communicate myself? I edit concepts that I think can relate to my thoughts, or maybe different feelings/atmosphere's I draw out from different music. I try to work my concepts into these moods in my AMVs. Which is why some people will probably never get my work unless they can relate on that same wave length in some form. Not all my work is like this of course.. for the most part it is though. When it comes to other editors work; I am extremely picky. I really only enjoy watching work that I feel are on the same wave length as my own thoughts. Those other editors who are trying to communicate themselves too.

Its not to say I don't think another editors work is great, or enjoyable or even less great. I just dive into the deeper realm. I look for artistic concepts, deeper notions. Which many but few AMVs even portray these... >.>

For the most part, I think a lot of AMVs are just AMVs.
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Re: How has the hobby made a difference in your life?

Postby Phantasmagoriat » Thu Jun 21, 2012 12:13 am

@Hopstep: you know, you'll find the technical knowledge you gain here will make you more popular with other people-- at least, whenever there is a computer in the room XD. And yes! AMVs definitely communicate Passion :up:

@Chained(E)Studio: Yeah, meeting important people is something that comes up time and time again, and it's nice to see you point out the diversity of people too; because we all see things a little differently; from different perspectives. I also like how you recognize the way they make you more ambitious, and be proud of the hobby, which people need to express more often. I might buy a few things from the site store to help with that :D . And I like your interpretation on what AMVs Communicate too: the self. :up:

-----------------

Now, I realize I wasn't very clear with my second question, so I have reworded it so people know what concept I'm referring to in the question:
"AMV's use [Effort to Understand; Effort to be Understood; to See through Different Eyes] on so many levels. How?"
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Re: How has the hobby made a difference in your life?

Postby TEKnician » Thu Jun 21, 2012 1:56 pm

I learned video compression and coding language. I learned avisynth.

I use this to teach customers why they can/can't do things with their computer that relate to video.

I grew more inclined to buy DVDs and support the anime market.

I got a supercomputer.

I feel a sense of accomplishment. I now have more reasons to go to other anime conventions.
Almost as hard as fighting a Holy Paladin.
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Re: How has the hobby made a difference in your life?

Postby DriftRoot » Sat Jun 23, 2012 9:54 pm

Phantasmagoriat wrote:How has the hobby made a difference in your life?

Most realistic "difference" would be the cost of my medical expenses. Had it not been for my involvement in AMVs, I would have deprived the U.S. healthcare system of around $30,000 in fees ranging from physical therapy and chiropractic services for chronic joint problems to surgery on an ankle I fractured attempting to attend a con AMV event. I'd be a healthier person if it weren't for AMVs, that's for sure!

The most "out there" difference would be having a creative outlet. I may make a living peddling my graphic design skills, but I almost never get the opportunity to work on something truly creative or the time to be as creative as I want to be. AMVs, in this regard, are a bizarre guilty pleasure for me, in that I answer to absolutely no one during the creative process and I can put in exactly as much time and effort as I wish.

AMV's use [Effort to Understand; Effort to be Understood; to see through Different Eyes] on so many levels. How?

I'm still a little vague on what you're looking for...but...back when Quadir and Kionon were doing their #AMVReview thing, I viewed that as an opportunity to move my AMV watching experience from being largely a solo operation to one with more of a group awareness. I learned a lot simply by being there and taking part in those discussions, but the main lesson for me related to the ops everyone was required to write prior to a #review session. Let me tell you: it's one thing to write an op and go off on your merry way with no one but the editor ever seeing or challenging what scores you gave or feedback you left, it is quite another to write an op that you then have to explain and justify to a bunch of other people who feel just as strongly about their own scores/feedback and may disagree with yours (particularly if they're all editors and you're "just" an AMV viewer). We all spent a lot of trying trying to "understand" these AMVs and trying to understand each other, and my main takeaway from that experience was that while making an effort to "understand" is fine, assuming that there is some kind of absolute truth TO understand can be a big mistake. These were AMVs we were discussing, not Dante's Inferno.

If AMV's are a form of Communication. What do they Communicate?

I'd say they communicate that human beings have an unstoppable drive to communicate with one another and themselves. We've got a lot going on upstairs (most of us do, anyways) and AMVs are a visual representation of that. We see things, we hear things and that inspires us to share what we see and hear with others. It also inspires us to try and capture concepts which do not tangibly exist until we give them form. AMVs have the same potential to communicate as any other form of human communication, they just happen to be restricted to having an anime component. Even then, this restriction can be rendered almost a null when you think of some of the highly creative and original AMVs out there which bear little or no resemblance to their anime sources.
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Re: How has the hobby made a difference in your life?

Postby Phantasmagoriat » Sun Jun 24, 2012 2:24 am

@TEKnician: You know, after reading that, I get the sense that my life has become much more anime/computer-centric.

@DriftRoot: Sorry to hear about the health thing :( but maybe that just emphasizes the love/hate relationship many of us have with the hobby. :nose:

Your take on [Effort to Understand; Effort to be Understood; to see through Different Eyes] is exactly what I want people to think about. It's all about Perspective; and putting in the effort to see from the perspective of others like the audience, other editors, experienced AMVers, inexperienced viewers etc... because there are so many ways you can look at it, especially as an editor because your are not just the editor, but you are also part of the audience. So you have to put in effort to understand the amv you are watching, and the interpretation by others; and you have to put in the effort to make your AMV understandable towards those perspectives. Because other editors/viewers have their own separate perspectives as well; and it becomes a huge challenge to communicate these perspectives to each other; so we can understand each other. Whether it be through reviews or through creating/experiencing the AMV's themselves, it's good to see the hobby in this light, so that we can all understand each other better. So I am very pleased with your answer. It's exactly the type of stuff I want people to think about. :D


I'd say they communicate that human beings have an unstoppable drive to communicate with one another and themselves.
I like reading this statement, and just thinking about it. Great answer. :up:
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Re: How has the hobby made a difference in your life?

Postby Pwolf » Sun Jun 24, 2012 7:16 pm

Phantasmagoriat wrote:"How has the hobby made a difference in your life?" Anything big/small, feel free share your story, as I have just shared mine.


I would say it's been pretty significant. If anything, the people I choose to be around were/are editors. These people have become my greatest friends. Before I really got into editing, I wasn't really into music all that much either. The hobby has expanded my views on music and also introduced me to many different genres and musical talents. I was also terribly anti-social. The hobby, through pushing myself to be more active in the community on the internet and at cons, as made me much more confident in myself as a person. While I still believe I'm the same person I was back then, I have changed a lot in the past 12 years. And over those past 12 years, through the many rough patches in my life and bad memories, some of the happiest moments in my life have been with the people I met through this hobby. I wouldn't trade them for anything.

Phantasmagoriat wrote:"AMV's use [Effort to Understand; Effort to be Understood; to see through Different Eyes] on so many levels. How?"


I can't speak for anyone else but, for me, I use AMVs as a way to express myself. I'm a relatively private person and I don't like to express myself too much. I use AMVs to almost vent or express what's on my mind. Wither that's trying to express my emotional state at the moment (I Wish You Were Here) or on a larger scope of trying to get people to see things outside of their immediate environment (As The World Crashes Down). And then of course, there's also that desire to get other people interested in something I really love and enjoy (Macross: Angle's Voice). Its incredibly difficult to do this though. I think a lot of people picked up that I made a lot of drama videos over the course of several years. This was a rough time for me but I don't think anyone really knew this was why I was doing it. Even more so with As The World Crashes Down. A lot of people missed the point of the video and assumed it was supposed to be about 9/11 when I was trying get people to not thinking about it in that manner.

I learned early on that you can't assume people will understand or get what you're trying to do. It's just not possible. I'd be happy if someone watched my work and got somethign out of it at all. I was never angry that people thought my video was about 9/11. I was actually rather happy that the video sparked enough of an emotional response from these people that they felt like it was and were upset about it. It means I accomplished something wither or not it was what I originally intended.

Phantasmagoriat wrote:"If AMV's are a form of Communication. What do they Communicate?"[/list]

Music in of itself is a medium of communication as are movies and tv shows. They all have some kind of story or agenda behind them. If not, then there's almost always an emotion(s) being conveyed. I think it's only natural that AMVs would fall into that realm as well. Even if the creator isn't directly trying to communicate said story or emotion, you can bet someone viewing the video will see something. There's no way around it. So in essence, I they communicate everything and anything. It all depends on what the editor and viewer get out of it.
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Re: How has the hobby made a difference in your life?

Postby Phantasmagoriat » Mon Jun 25, 2012 12:40 am

@Pwolf: This seems very appropriate after reading your responses:
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Re: How has the hobby made a difference in your life?

Postby BasharOfTheAges » Mon Jun 25, 2012 11:00 am

It's a subtle distinction, but one worth making, that even though anyone has to right to get anything they want out of your work, they don't have the right to re-define your actual intent or position based on their bizarre reasoning and interpretation or to even claim their interpretation is the meaning or purpose.

So, remember, always phrase your sentences correctly when doing literary analysis.
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IIRC, Hemingway drunkenly proclaimed once that there was no symbolism in The Old Man and the Sea. This made me lol quite hard after an entire class of discussing the symbolism in said book.
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Re: How has the hobby made a difference in your life?

Postby Phantasmagoriat » Mon Jun 25, 2012 1:24 pm

BasharOfTheAges wrote:It's a subtle distinction, but one worth making, that even though anyone has to the right to get anything they want out of your work, they don't have the right to re-define your actual intent or position based on their bizarre reasoning and interpretation or to even claim their interpretation is the meaning or purpose.
wooooo, I think I agree with you on that Bashar! Now, because of that, here is the so-called "Brick Wall" we all face:

People are going to interpret things the way they want anyway.
(lame but ironic example: The grammar mistake in your quote... or maybe you meant to say it that way... IDK both work: "everyone has the right" vs "everyone has [access] to right" and that's without getting into the "anyone" vs "everyone" thing)

Ima drop the Jesus bomb now: Just look at the Bible and observe the ways people try to interpret that thing. It has gotten to the point that entirely separate religions have spawned due to different interpretations and rejections altogether. So try as we may, interpretation is uncontrollable. Much the same as if I say something, that doesn't mean anyone is going to listen to me. As an example, consider how my initial post can be interpreted as hostile (and I admit I went a little overboard with the theatrics, so I'm sorry to anyone if I came across that way). Nobody has control over the observer. Nobody has control over the viewer. And this extends to AMVs and any form of Communication really. Yet, we do have control over our own interpretations and communications. That is part of the reason why I put the words "Effort to Understand; Effort to be Understood; to See through Different Eyes." in my signature now. If we could all just see through the eyes of each other, everything would change; not just in AMVs, but also in our lives. And that's also why I started this thread. :wink:

On a related note:
It reminds me of that time some kid was looking for Magic Pad on these boards, and he described the AMV as
[paraphrasing] "This dude took his gf on a honeymoon to Mars and they even had a picnic I think..."
I had a good chuckle, but that was his interpretation :P
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Re: How has the hobby made a difference in your life?

Postby Emong » Mon Jun 25, 2012 3:36 pm

Pwolf wrote:I learned early on that you can't assume people will understand or get what you're trying to do.

That's only one side of the coin. The other one is that even you don't really understand or get what you're trying to do. You try to do one thing, then suddenly notice you're doing something else, and when you're finally finished with your product, thinking that it's a unique deep piece of art, somebody informs you about all the cliched tricks and storyline patterns you had used. And this is when you realize: "oh...you're actually right". Sometimes there's more truth in what you actually do than what you think you're doing.

And this, I think, opens up a space for critique that avoids both deadlocks, the snobbish one and the relativistic one. On the one side we have people who claim to possess knowledge of some kind of a universal standard to which all amvs can be compared, and on the other side we fall into this trap of subjective relativism ("Everything is just personal preference and we can't ever understand each other's visions and preferences"). Both options are wrong. Ofcourse, I can't fully adopt your perspective but neither can you so we're ultimately on the same boat here. Therefore, let me make my own judgement of your work. Perhaps I'll even succeed in pointing out things that you "objectively" did without you even noticing, perhaps you'll find my opinions boring and stupid and biased. Either way, we both probably learned something, even if only in tiny amount, in the process.

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